Corn Earworm

Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)


Fall Armyworm

Spodoptera frugiperda

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Corn earworm and fall armyworm infest the whorls and grain heads of sorghum plants. Larvae hatching from eggs laid on sorghum leaves before grain heads are available migrate to and feed on tender, folded leaves in the whorl.

To find larvae in sorghum whorls, pull the whorl leaf from the plant and unfold it. Frass, or larval excrement, is present where larvae feed within the whorl. Damaged leaves unfolding from the whorl are ragged with "shot holes." Although this may look dramatic, leaf damage usually does not reduce yields greatly, and control of larvae during the whorl stage is seldom economically justified. Also, larvae within the whorl are somewhat protected from insecticide.

Insecticide application may be justified if larval feeding reduces leaf area by more than 30 percent or is damaging the developing grain head or growing point within the whorl.

 

 

 
THIS INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE IS BASED ON EMPIRICAL DATA OBTAINED THROUGH MANY YEARS OF RESEARCH. HOWEVER, NEITHER THE USDA, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, WEST TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE RESEARCH OR KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY WARRANT THE VALIDITY OF THE INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE AND MAKE NO REPRESENTATIONS WHATSOEVER WITH REGARD TO THE USE OF THE SOFTWARE FOR PEST MANAGEMENT. FURTHER, USDA, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, WEST TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE RESEARCH AND KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY MAKE NO WARRANTIES AS TO THE MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS OF THE INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR ANY OTHER WARRANTIES EXPRESS OR IMPLIED.